This page contains the information from the Walking Tour of Yarmouth's Heritage Properties

The below map shows the location of each of the 28 stops along the route of Yarmouth's Heritage Properties Walking Tour.  One part of the tour will take you through some of Yarmouth's residential and Main Street areas while another will take you through the Collins Heritage Conservation District.

Hold your mouse's pointer over any of the numbers along the route to read a description of the property(ies) at that stop and click on it to be brought below to see images and a greater description. Click on any of the 'CLICK HERE' links to view a larger image or images from each stop. Click on 'Back to Map' to return to the Map and choose another location. Or you may wish to scroll down and begin at Number One and work your way through the tour.

You can also CLICK HERE to begin a slideshow of full sized images taken from this walking tour. The images should automatically re-size in order to be viewed within your browser's window. Click on the next and back buttons at the bottom to go forward or back and on the 'X' button to close the Slideshow. You may also want to depress the 'F11' Key at the top of your keyboard to enter 'Full Screen' mode. (This allows the Slideshow images to open in the largest possible size). Depress the 'F11' Key once again to return to normal view.

Click HERE to download a copy of the Walking Tour Brochure in PDF format which provides an ample amount of information on the styles and history of the buildings along the route. It's best to print it on 8-1/2" X 14" paper if you have it. Enjoy your tour.

 

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1 - Murray Manor

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Murray Manor, on the corner of Forest and Main St., was built c. 1820 for Dr. Joseph Bond (Yarmouth's first doctor) in the Regency Gothic style. Notice the Gothic art1windows on the ground floor and the small windows, low to the floor, on the second floor.

These windows are variously called "kneeling windows," praying windows," or "belly windows." The thorn trees in front formed one of Yarmouth's famous thorn hedges, the original plants having been imported from England.

CLICK HERE for two larger images.

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2 - Rev. John Moody Residence

17 Forest St. was built in 1855 for Rev. John Moody in the Gothic Revival style with vernacular features. Notice the circular attic windows, the gate posts, and in particular, the asymmetrical front.

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3 - Bank of Montreal Manager's Residence

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22 Forest Street - Across the street and slightly set back is a fine example of the Queen Anne Revival style. This house belonged to the Bank of Montreal for many years and was used as their manager's residence. Notice the circular attic windows, the gate posts and, in particular, the off centre front.

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4 - 64 William Street

64 William Street - The house on the right hand corner of Forest and William Streets was built in 1899 for J.M. Lawson, editor of the Yarmouth Herald and compiler of Yarmouth Reminiscences. Notice the columns supporting the balcony, the stained glass and the spiral woodwork pattern. Opposite is the Trinity Rectory, a house in the Georgian style.

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5 - Holy Trinity Church

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63 William Street - Holy Trinity Church is the fourth Anglican Church in Yarmouth. It was started in 1866 and consecrated in 1872. It was designed by the Rev. Mr. J.R. art2Campbell in the early English Gothic style as a small version of a Cathedral. Its lofty spire was removed in 1913 due to the added weights and stresses when the chimes were installed in the tower in 1908.

Notice the stained-glass windows and the Gothic Revival architecture style. Visitors are welcome, please check with the parish secretary in the church hall.

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 6 - Gothic Revival Home

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57 William Street - Yarmouth's finest example of a Gothic Revival home is located at 57 William St. It was built from 1877-78 by Robert Eakins as one of two identical houses, gifts for his daughter and son. Notice the gables with their unique verge-boards, and the steeply-pitched gable roof. The twin house, located next door, was lost to fire in 1992.

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7 - Hugh Cann House

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56 William St. was built in 1855 by a ship owner, Hugh Cann, as a present for his niece on the condition that she add "Cann" to her name. It was built facing the garden to the south. Notice the steep hip roof, the "shed" dormers, and the shingle pattern.

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8 - Saint Ambrose Cathedral

St. Ambrose Cathedral (Roman Catholic) is the cathedral of the diocese of Yarmouth. It was built in 1889, and doubled in length in 1910. Both "towers" were originally higher, the left-hand one being higher than the roof-line, the right-hand one being of roof height. The large white house adjacent to the west, built in 1894, serves as the diocesan office. As an aside, there are eight other Catholic churches in Yarmouth & Acadian Shores (Hwy. 1 & 3) that are architectural testaments to religion and wealth. Ask at the visitor information centre for more information.

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9 - Intersection of Forest & Park Street

thumb9a At the intersection of Forest & Park St. are four must-sees. #39 was constructed in 1889 and has a fine example of a cupola, sometimes called a "widow's watch."
#41 was constructed in 1880, and is a fine example of the Second Empire style. Note the round-headed dormers with finials on top and the elaborate trim elements on the front tower.  thumb9b
thumb9c #42 was built in 1888-89 in a simple Queen Anne Revival style with a wraparound veranda. 

#44 was built around 1876 in the Gothic Revival style. Note the decorative trusses in the gables, which are very rare in Yarmouth.

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10 - Charles L. Brown House

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52 Park St. was built in 1892-93 for Charles L. Brown, of the firm "Brown and Smith, painters and paper-hangers". It is a 2 storey Queen Anne Revival home. The facade is asymmetrical with a highly ornamented off-center enclosed entry porch and the interrupted 2 storey bay window.

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11 - The Bishop's Residence

art4The Yarmouth Diocese Bishop's residence, 53 Park St., was built in 1892 for a local merchant, Mr. Levi Wyman, in the Queen Anne Revival style.

During its construction it was wired for electricity though that form of energy was not yet available to Yarmouth households.

Notice the elaborate trim, the carvings below the windows and the superb stained glass window on the north side of the house. This well kept house and its grounds are a pleasure to behold.

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12 - J. Lyons Hatfield House

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2 Clements St., built in 1894 is a 2-1/2 storey Queen Anne Revival style home. It features a distinctive widow's walk, a typical feature on this style of home in Nova. Scotia. The decorative trim found in the corners under the veranda roof, also known as brackets in verandas, was made possible by the new technology available at the turn of the century. J. Lyons Hatfield, Esq. built this house after a fire destroyed his previous house, shop and barn.

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13 - 23 Clements Street

23 Clements St., built in 1891, is Greek Revival in design yet shows influence of the Queen Anne Revival style. A tower shaped roof on the veranda and elaborate woodwork add to the Victorian feel of the home.

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14 - Sea Captain's Houses

Coming down Collins St., pay particular attention to the three large houses on the left, #s 25-21, including their windows, stained glass, thorn hedges and outbuildings. Notice the flat roof portions that give evidence of once present widow's walks, often found too expensive to maintain. These are typical sea captain's or ship owner's houses.

CLICK HERE for three larger images.

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15 - Yarmouth County Museum

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22 Collins St., The Yarmouth County Museum, built in 1893 of Shelburne County granite in the Gothic Revival style, was originally the Congregational Tabernacle. The building became a historical museum in 1967, showcasing Yarmouth's sea-faring past, and has the third largest collection of ship portraits in Canada on display. Stop inside to learn more about the ship owning wealth in the area.

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16 - The Pelton-Fuller House

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20 Collins St., the Pelton-Fuller House, is open to visitors as a museum. It was constructed c. 1892 in the Italianate style by Edward Cann, a local merchant tailor. Incidentally, this dwelling became the summer home of the original Fuller Brush Man, and many of his brushes are on display in the home.

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17 - Intersection of Collins and Willow Street

art6The intersection of Collins and Willow Streets gives examples of four distinct housing styles: #14 (c. 1845) is New England Colonial, #16 (c. 1875) is Second Empire, #13 (c. 1875-78) is Italianate, and #11 (c.1835) is Gothic Revival.

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18 - The Lovitt Houses

art814, 12, and 10 Parade St. were constructed for the Lovitt Family in the late 1800s. #10 was constructed in 1862 in art7the Georgian style for Capt. John Lovitt and his wife, Elizabeth Guest, by his father, John W Lovitt. The tower was added in 1891.

#12 was constructed in the Italianate style in 1874 again by John W Lovitt, as a wedding gift for his daughter Mary Ellen Lovitt and her husband, George Guest. Notice the rope-like carved mouldings adorning the corners of the house, and the port holes in the frieze band.

Finally, #14 was constructed for John W Lovitt's widow in 1874, as she wanted to live near her children. This is an example of the Greek Revival style, which also has some Gothic Revival and Italianate style elements.

CLICK HERE for three larger images.

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19 - The Firefighter's Museum

Continue to the Firefighter's Museum at 451 Main St., and see almost every type of fire engine ever used in Nova Scotia, including hand-drawn, hand-operated engines, to horse-drawn steamers and motorized apparatus, along with firefighting memorabilia. This is the world of the firefighter in a province where the houses are constructed primarily of wood, not brick.

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20 - Sweeney Fisheries Museum

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Venture down to 112 Water St., to visit the W L. Sweeney Fisheries Museum. Located on the second floor of the Burrell Johnson building, this museum is a to-scale reconstruction of a seven building shipping wharf that existed in Yarmouth. Wander through the buildings and coastal freighter, and learn about an industry which allowed Yarmouth to build the large "ship owners" homes that you are seeing today.

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21 - Frost Park

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Walk through Frost Park, the first burying ground in Yarmouth (notice the old headstones). It was named for Sydney Frost, a Yarmouthian who became President of the Bank of Nova Scotia. This well-shaded park features a 150 year-old three tier fountain, and a compass rose observation deck overlooking Yarmouth Harbour.

CLICK HERE for two larger images.

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22 - Main at the Intersection of Jenkins Street

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Continue along Main St. noticing the roof lines and windows on many of the buildings. Notice the RH. Davis building, whose owner George Lovitt (the nephew of John W Lovitt - see stop #18) left his initials in date stone on corner window posts. The Woole Shoppe on the corner of Jenkins St. is a fine example of the mercantile application of Classic Revival style.

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23 - Nova Scotia Art Gallery

Notice the large grey building on the corner of Main St. and Alma Sq. It was constructed from 1912-1913, and served as the Royal Bank of Canada's Yarmouth branch until 1979. Today it operates as a satellite branch of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, and visitors are welcome. Noteworthy are the large segmental arched bays with Corinthian keystone trim, pilasters with Corinthian capitals, and the dental trim at the top of the building.

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24 - Killam Brothers Building

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A quick detour down Central St. will reveal the Killam Brothers Building, built in the 1830s. This building deserves mention as it housed the offices of the Killam family, who led Yarmouth's sea faring trade from 1788 until they closed in 1991. The building is now open seasonally as an extension of the Yarmouth County Museum (stop #13).

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25 - Brick Mercantile Building

art11Returning to Main St., across the street, notice 328 Main St., which is the oldest brick mercantile building in Southwest Nova Scotia. It was built in 1855-56 by the partnership of Young & Baker.

Opposite, at #329, is Yarmouth's only example of a Dutch style gable front.

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26 - Brick Commercial Blocks

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Continuing south along Main St., the brick commercial blocks were built in the 1880s and 1890s. They serve as a testament to Yarmouth's wealth in the "age of sail" Many show interesting detail, particularly the corner "tower" at 296 Main St. The first occupants of this building in the 1890s were a butcher, a wholesale confectioner, a restaurant, and a dry goods store, where such things as furs, fabrics, and ready-made garments were sold.

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27 - The Yarmouth Hotel

266 Main St., the brick building with the three-storey bay window was built in 1865-66 as the Yarmouth Hotel by R Balfour Brown, a well-known Yarmouth cartoonist of the day.

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28 - Salvation Army Citadel

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At 259 Main St. is the former Salvation Army Citadel, built in 1905-06 in the Italianate style. Today, it still operates as a part of the local Salvation Army, housing their Thrift Shop. The building next-to it, 255 Main St., served from 1903 to the mid 1920s as an American Consulate.

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